Wednesday, September 26, 2012

US Military Detention of Americans in US

Text with below video:
Published on Sep 25, 2012 by
Alex also welcomes guest Carl Mayer, the attorney representing American Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist Chris Hedges in his legal battle to keep President Obama's power to send US citizens to military prisons without right to trial or attorney, or NDAA privilege, at bay.
https://www.stopndaa.org/






 Is felony arresting citizens who write with chalk on sidewalks in the best interest of the American people? Is this a more serious offense than to rape, sexually assault, assault, and even rape someone? A felony can prevent someone from ever getting a decent apartment, a house, a good job, or may even prevent getting dates, a significant other, or getting married. Arrests and prosecutions should be to protect the public, not to protect international corporations and bankers!
  
Interview Truther Chalk Campaign Launched: Free Speech is at Stake

Text with video:
Published on Sep 26, 2012 by
Amy Larson readily admits writing "9/11 Truth" and "9/11 Truth Now" in chalk on the First Street sidewalk over Napa Creek.

"I just want people to think for themselves," said Larson, 29. "I believe we've lost a lot of civil liberties since the 9/11 attacks. I'm really concerned about that.

"This is political free speech," added Larson, who says the investigation into the terrorist attacks in New York City and Washington, D.C. should be reopened.

Her chalk writing — which occurred Sept. 11, the 11th anniversary of the terrorist attacks — got Larson arrested on suspicion of vandalism.


[click here for more video and more on this subject]

Wednesday, September 19, 2012

Having Children is an Excuse for the State to Arrest You

The below story is cut and pasted [from here]

Mom sues police and neighbor after she is arrested for letting her kids play outside

Allowing your kids to play on scooters outside the house on a quiet street seems innocent--and common--enough. But a Texas mom was arrested and spent the night in jail after a neighbor complained that the children were unsupervised.

The parent, Tammy Cooper, disputes the "humiliating" charge, saying she was watching the kids, ages 6 and 9, the whole time from a lawn chair.

But police took the neighbor at her word, and a few hours after the call, arrested Cooper for child endangerment. Cooper told KPRC that the arresting officer told her, "We're here for you."

The accused parent spent the night behind bars. "Orange jump suit, in a cell, slammed the door, for 18 hours," she said.

Cooper is suing the La Porte Police Department, the officer, and the neighbor who made the call. In a statement, the police department said it was "confident of the known actions of the officers on the scene that evening."

The neighbor had no comment.

 



[more videos about our US Police State] http://thegetjusticecoalition.blogspot.com/2012/09/soldiers-and-cops-have-dibs-on-girls.html

Sunday, September 16, 2012

David Hicks: The Man Who Was Chemically Tortured

The below is re-posted [from here]

by Binoy Kampmark / September 16th, 2012

One sensed they were out to get him from the start. David Hicks, a misguided, foolish man, who found himself at a paramilitary camp in Afghanistan, had to be punished. Since the Australian authorities struggled to find a basis to get the former Guantánamo inmate for his participation on the wrong side of ‘terror’, they did so vicariously. Hicks, detained for six and a half years, made an Alford plea, acknowledging the submitted evidence without admitting to the charges. He was convicted under the Military Commissions Act 2006 for providing material support for terrorism and served a seven-month prison sentence in Australia on his return.

The reason why there is now renewed interest in the Hicks case arises from documents and revelations from the proceeds of crime action launched by the Australian government. The patriotic darlings could not quite get their head around the fact that Hicks would want to write his own account about what happened in Guantánamo. They made an effort, which they subsequently dropped on July 24, to seize any earnings that might have accrued from Guantanamo: My Journey. In so doing, a few items of dirty laundry came out.

Some of this relates to the use of various drugs on the inmate population for “non-therapeutic” purposes. Euphemistically, this has been termed “pharmaceutical interrogation”, giving the impression that your local pharmacist would like to have a friendly word with you. When the all seeing state is the entity responsible for administering the needle or the pill, the stakes are somewhat different.

The dossier on Hicks’s treatment is getting weightier, and would have been far more illuminating had the case gone ahead. There are supporting statements from New York lawyer Josh Dratel and former Guantánamo Bay guard Brendon Neely, saying that that inmates would be rough handled for refusing to take the “medication”. According to Dratel, US prosecutors admitted that “guards had forced him to eat a meal which contained a sedative before they read him the charges”.

A few of the names of the drugs used in the torture process have been removed. This is not a feast the prosecuting authorities wish the public, Australian or international, to partake in. Stephen Kenny, one of the first legal eagles to swoop into Guántanamo Bay, is puzzled. “If they were genuine medications then why does the name of the drug need to be removed?” (Sydney Morning Herald, September 15). Scrap the word “genuine”, and we are at least halfway there in our stumble to what actually happened.

Drugs that are known to have been administered to the detainees, in high dosages, include mefloquine. That drug was used ostensibly to combat malaria. According to US Defense Department files, 1,250 mg of the drug were given to all arrivals to the centre in January 2002, an amount based on the assumption that all the recipients had malaria. The authorities were generous enough to avoid testing for that fact.

Administered in high dosages to those uninfected or asymptomatic was likened, as army doctor Maj. Remington L. Nevin is quoted as saying, to “pharmalogic waterboarding” (SMH, Sep 15). The detainees, according to Nevin, were exposed to “unacceptably high risks of potentially severe neuropsychiatric side effects, including seizures, intense vertigo, hallucinations, paranoid delusions, aggression, panic, anxiety, severe insomnia and thoughts of suicide” (Truthout, Dec 1, 2010). His discussion in the journal Tropical Medicine and International Health (October 2012) makes gruesome reading, concluding that “there was no plausible public health indication for the use of mefloquine at Guantánamo and that based on prevailing standards of care, the clinical indications for its use are decidedly unclear.”

The reports in the Sydney Morning Herald that Hicks was a recipient of various drugs that could well constitute a form of pharmacologic torture has become something of a hoary old chestnut. Truthout’s investigative report from December 1, 2010 noted how the Defense Department had made all Guantánamo Bay detainees take mefloquine, whether they had malaria or otherwise. Army Staff Sgt.

Joe Hickman is the lynchpin here in revealing that three Guantánamo detainees who died in 2006 “could not have died by hanging themselves”. During the course of his investigations, Hickman found that the inmates had received mefloquine.

In a policy environment where torture is justified, by whatever name or appellation, the adoption of a drugs program to deal with state designated Untermenschen, and outcast subjects is irresistible. The case gets even less surprising when authorities of such clout as the US Food and Drug Administration can put Lariam, the brand name of mefloquine on the legal list. Besides, what is good for American prison inmates, the first to be exposed to quinolines, is good for non-American terrorist suspects.

This sordid story is another reminder that Australia’s government is one of the few on this peculiar planet to bequeath its citizens to other regimes and fob off infractions against them. Be it torture, suspect trials, and questionable legal proceedings, Canberra has stepped to the merry tune of its friends in Washington. Citizenship is merely a conjuring trick in the immigration offices, a matter of ceremony rather than substance. Hicks’s torture, of which the authorities in Canberra have been, to various degrees, complicit tells us that it will never reach the eyes of a properly constituted court.

Binoy Kampmark was a Commonwealth Scholar at Selwyn College, Cambridge. He lectures at RMIT University, Melbourne and can be reached at: bkampmark@gmail.com. Read other articles by Binoy.

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Will 100 mil die in Take Over of US?


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